If I wanted to write a novel is there any class for that? — Asked by Anonymous

There’s How to Write a Novel typically taught by Ben Anastas.

Also students can choose to work on a novel as their advanced work.

Really though, any lit class you take will teach you how to write and edit (arguably the most important parts of creating a novel).

And any other class you take will give you something to write about (the other important part). 

-Emily ‘16

Nice try, Betsy. Animals don’t have jobs.-Alan ‘15

Nice try, Betsy. Animals don’t have jobs.
-Alan ‘15

Hello there!! I too am a Freshman coming to Bennington in the fall and I was also wondering about the housing. Will we be able to choose which house we get put into for example the Colonials, Barnes, Woo or do we get placed according to the housing selection form. Thank you!!! :)) — Asked by Anonymous

awesome! you must be so so so excited! 

Just yesterday I answered a similar question about housing, so take a look! 

p.s. on that same housing questionnaire that you’ll be getting soon, there’s a space for you to specify your preference…but it’s not guaranteed that you’ll get your choice ! 

See ya in the fall! 

~Doug ‘16~

Is it true that the course offerings come out tomorrow? When? Can we access them immediately? — Asked by Anonymous

http://curriculum.bennington.edu/fall2014/

image

just too many good things coming our way… 

!

~Doug ‘16~

What is the deadline for sending our intent to enroll? — Asked by mooodindigo

Hi Miss Indigo,

The deadline for the intent to enroll form/ deposit is May 1st!

Genelle ‘15

Hello! I recently found Bennington in a college book I was flipping through, and it sounds like a great fit for me. I really like the sound of such a small, caring community with a positive push to study what you are truly interested in. However, I'm from the South (where it's often sunny and warm) and worried the change in temperature would be a hard adjustment. Would you say the weather would be tolerable for someone who sees way more sun than snow? — Asked by Anonymous

Hey anon!  Ray to the rescue.  I’ve divided my life almost evenly between the South and New England, so maybe I’m a little more adapted to the cold than most Texans, but I’m confident that if I can Vermont then you can too.™  There are a few key pieces to living with the cold:

  • First, the worst of the winter happens during Field Work Term.  You can be anywhere in the world during FWT; unless you like knee-deep snow (a legit lifestyle choice) then be somewhere not here.  The tail end and bright beginnings of fall and spring terms really only ever present Winter Lite, so you should be fine there.
  • Second, winter clothing sold in the South and winter clothing sold in the North, even under the same brand names, are not the same.  If possible I’d advise waiting until you get here, taking some recommendations, and then buying a winter coat.  If that’s not an option for you, just try for something windproof, and remember that Vermonters sometimes wear tshirts in 35-degree weather.  Coat-wise, go heavier than your natural tendencies tell you to.
  • Booooooooots.  The college does a good job of keeping the sidewalks clear, so you can technically get on with daily life with sneakers and good woolly socks, but boots are essential for winter adventures.  Decent tread and waterproofing are more important than insulation for mild to moderate adventuring: again, woolly socks.

tl;dr it’ll be fine.  My Alabama sweetheart isn’t a half-timer like me, and she would live in the snow if she could.  There might be a learning curve, but you’ll probably still be better off than the Californians (#southernpride).

-Ray ‘15

Hey there! I'm just wondering if there's an Orthodox Christian church close to Bennington. :) I wasn't sure who to ask -- so figured you awesome people would be the ones! — Asked by Anonymous

Hey anon!  Unfortunately, it looks like the nearest Orthodox church is about an hour and twenty minutes away, in someplace called Northfield Falls.  Sorry.

Hi! So I have three questions -When is freshman move in? -Are freshmen housed together? -How does the roommate match up/housing assignment process work? Thanks! — Asked by Anonymous

hey hey, 

so first of all // no such thing as freshman housing! As a first year student, you’ll start off by living in any of the houses on campus with a medley of students. 

As for your other questions, the beginning of orientation is when you can start to move into your room and house. You’ll receive your room key at orientation actually. Orientation starts August 29. Once enrolled, sometime in the summer you’ll be asked to fill out a housing questionnaire (just a short series of questions geared towards figuring out what your lifestyle is like) in order to do our best to match you with a good roommate! 

~Doug ‘16~ 

any anime fans at Bennington? — Asked by Anonymous

YO!

hella anime fans, as well as western animation and everything in between. In fact, the Bennington Animation Club screens a different movie every weekend. Currently watching Space Dandy myself, with the occasional Samurai Champloo every now and then.

I also like to put on Akira when I’m working in the POD in VAPA every couple of Fridays.

image

see you, space cowboy.

kagan ‘16

Sometimes I doubt my academic abilities. Everyone at Bennington seems to be doing so much of their own research or projects and while I have the motivation to do such things, I don't know if I have the ability. I struggle with feeling academically inferior. It seems that students just know a ton! I know knowledge isn't acquired instantly and it's all a process. I am just nervous I'm not smart enough.. maybe that's my own insecurity. Could someone talk about their first year academic experience? — Asked by Anonymous

I am going to tell you a secret and it’s that sometimes people have great poker faces when in reality they are just as insecure and unsure about their academic abilities.

I was really stressed out last year because I thought everyone knew exactly what they wanted to do for the next four years and then for the rest of their lives. Poker faces. Also, lots of people end up doing complete 180’s and study something totally different than what they had originally planned. I mean, Glennis wanted to be a film student. A film student. This is what she does now:

image

Gradually, you’ll find things that you’re really passionate about. You’ll naturally become knowledgeable about these things just by virtue of studying them as in depth as you want and by talking with friends as you explain things you’re excited about to them and they explain things to you.

Plus, I bet you are ridiculously knowledgeable about something already and just because it doesn’t sound “academic” doesn’t mean it’s not valid. We all can’t be meta-linguistic kinetic neuroscience students. There are more types of intelligence than just knowledge, aesthetic and emotional intelligence are just as valued here (among many other types of smartness), and everyone here finds different ways to express their unique brilliance.   

-Emily ‘16

Hi! I loved Bennington on the tour, but I'm concerned about the small size of Bennington and the subsequently limited course list. Have any of you ever noticed a lack of course variety or felt inhibited by the small size of the school? For example, my mom pointed out that no art history courses are offered; Is that a temporary thing? Is there a way to get a course created by working with the right professor? — Asked by Anonymous

hey anon,

I guess I’ll start off by saying that I understand your concern about Bennington’s small campus and student body size. In fact I’d have to be honest it’s one of the things that I love and also one of the things that frustrates me a lot about being here. This small community is beautiful and its small size has allowed me to form intense bonds with faculty and friends but at the same time, I’m from L.A. and I do tend to get somewhat cabin-feverish a couple times a term. 

That being said, Bennington’s size has no influence over the variety of classes that are offered each term, and I’m pretty confident that most Bennington students would agree with me. I have yet to come across a curriculum of classes that I don’t feel like I’m drowning in! The variety and the breadth of classes can actually be quite overwhelming, especially when you realize that your favorite classes take place at the same time or when it feels like half of the school population wants to take that one class (lol). 

I study Visual Arts and have taken Art History courses here - art history plays an important role in contextualizing and informing my thoughts and ideas. While it may seem that there are a small number of art history courses, not one VA class at Bennington would be complete without directly studying the history of the course’s medium. Many art classes involve writing, reading, and in-class study in addition to an intensive studio practice. There’s surely exposure outside of art history courses. 

To answer that last question about “getting a course created” : that to me sounds like starting a small “tutorial” with a teacher in any given discipline here. If you have a clear inquiry, have been in dialogue with a teacher here and maybe have other friends or students on board with that same inquiry or interest, there’s nothing stopping you from creating one. 

Hope that answers your question! 

~Doug ‘16~

Bennington is everyone I met on campus, everyone I worked with and learned from. And it’s everyone they worked with and learned from. It’s a shared energy that comes from our collaborations. Bennington fosters new ideas and forges connections. In this way, a Bennington education never ends.
- Katari Sporrong ’11

Bennington is everyone I met on campus, everyone I worked with and learned from. And it’s everyone they worked with and learned from. It’s a shared energy that comes from our collaborations. Bennington fosters new ideas and forges connections. In this way, a Bennington education never ends.

Katari Sporrong ’11

Spring Dodgeball Tournament! | Facebook

Dodge, Dip, Dive, Duck, and Dodge! Check out the photos from the latest Dodgeball tournament! There is a Dodgeball league every term culminating in a giant showdown which bring many back to the good ole days of middle school. The teams consist of house teams, friend groups, and several Campus Safety officers looking for a little friendly competition, but mostly looking to have a lot of fun.

Genelle ‘15

Does your Field Work Term have to be related to your area of study/your plan? — Asked by Anonymous

Hi person!

For your first Field Work Term, your choice of location does not have to be based on your course of study, mainly because you will probably not yet have a strict direction to your work (not that you ever really do……. “just kidding”). However, whatever you intuitively choose will still probably weasel its way into your future studies somehow, just based on the fact that you chose it and will learn about yourself and your interests in the process.

In terms of your FWTs post-first-year, they do have to be somehow related to your Plan, but there are ways of finding connections between an organization and your studies that don’t have to be super direct. Also, because you design your Plan based on your personal interests, it doesn’t really feels limiting to have to choose something that connects to your Plan. ALSO your FWTs often shape your Plan as much as your Plan shapes your FWTs.

Wheeee!!

Chloe

Bathroom User Review: Dogs

Quality users. In my bathroom studies here at Bennington have found that a bathroom user affects a bathroom experience just as much as the bathroom’s safety, design, comfort, or quality. It is with this in mind that I am reviewing bathroom users. Today the hot topic is dogs. Dogs are interesting because they put so much effort into not using any sort of bathroom. Cats use litter boxes and humans use bathrooms. Why should dogs stay out of the fun? Dogs have 4 legs (2 more than humans) but no arms. This means they can’t use sinks. Sinks are useless to dogs. They don’t care. They just look away. I have the clever opportunity to interview some dogs myself. After some short e-mails back and fourth I agreed to meet the dogs tied to the fence of the Barn at i’m-bored-of-taking-pictures-of-bathrooms-o’clock sharp. The brown, more outgoing dog was Lola and the multicolored brownish shy dog was Caroline. They gave me their numbers immediately but made it clear off the bat that flirting with them was not okay and that the interview would end immediately if I tried. The situation was tense but I handled it with ease. I asked them what they thought it was about bathrooms that made them want to use grass instead. “They’re disrespectful,” said Lola. “They promote a 2 hand, 2 foot lifestyle, when in reality, plenty of people live fine with 4 feet.” “Woof,” said Caroline (age 8). “Woof bowow woof ahoooohhhhhh!!!” Personally, I believe that what I think is right is right and I believe that toilets are useful. We’re not trying to spread a 2 handed and 2 footed regime. Toilets are just best for us. If dogs want their own bathrooms they’re going to have to grow thumbs fist.

User Rating: 8 out of 10

Best quality is the best.
-Alex BG