Posts tagged painting

Even if you aren't focusing on visual art like ceramics and painting and whatnot, is there a studio or workroom where students outside of the program can use the resources? — Asked by Anonymous

VAPA, the visual and performing arts building, is (for the most part) open 24 hours a day, and that only excludes areas with unusually expensive or dangerous equipment (i.e. digital arts studios or the wood shop, both of which are locked at night). Because of this open environment, there is definitely room in various studios for those who are just casually interested in experimenting with VA outside of class, as long as they don’t interfere with classes currently in session and provide their own materials.

That being said, you definitely don’t have to have a focus in the visual arts in order to take VA studio classes! Studio classes are made up of everyone from the casually interested to those whose Plans are entirely in the visual arts.

Hope this helps!

- Rachel ‘14

Ann Pibal Awarded deCordova Museum’s Award

Painting faculty member, Ann Pibal, recently just won the 2013 Rappaport Prize from the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum. Check out the title link and here for some of Ann’s work. 

-Glennis

 

It’s junior review time!

This week, visual arts students in the first term of their junior year are presenting works that they have created thus far at Bennington. Each student will meet with a team of three visual arts faculty members to discuss their work and where it will go from here. A walk through the upstairs gallery of VAPA reveals work ranging from digital art to painting to architecture to ceramics, plus much more!

Above work:

Paintings and prints: Ellen Hanson

Drawings: Suzanne Porath

Architecture Drawings: Miya Chua

- Rachel ‘14

Above are photos of the most recent project from the beginning painting course, Form and Process: Investigations in Painting, taught by Ann Pibal. The class was instructed to choose six different fruits or vegetables and match them to different background color palettes. The result is a wide variety of natural shades and forms that, from my own experience, contribute to a fantastic introduction to painting with oil colors. Form and Process is open to anyone in any academic year at the beginning painting level.

- Rachel ‘14

rachelebj:

This morning in my advanced painting course, Critical Response in Painting, my friend Christina did a presentation on the above artist, Austin Power. While visual arts courses at Bennington are about creating and presenting student work, they’re also about exploring the art world at large, and because of that, I’ve been able to find new artists that I find inspiring that I would have most likely never heard of otherwise. Now, thanks to Christina, I have a new artist that I find exciting, and I can’t wait to look further at his work.

Austin Power’s website: http://withapower.com/

benningtoncollege:

Studios

[reblogged by Ellie]

benningtoncollege:

Studios

[reblogged by Ellie]

I’m really lucky to be in a curatorial tutorial this term called “Thematic Exposure”, taught by painter/faculty member Andy Spence. I’m even LUCKIER that he made the time for me to do the class a half hour earlier than it officially meets because I have another class at the exact same time. (This is the closest I’ll ever get to using a Time Turner.) This means that half the class is actual work, and the other half is just me and Andy talking about art whatever. This morning, he showed me his Whitney Museum Artist Lifetime Pass card because, obviously, Andy’s work is a part of the Whitney’s permanent collection. Most of the time, I think of Andy as a professor first, and as an artist second, so sometimes it’s mildly surprising when he does stuff like remind me that he is in fact in the permanent collections of 33 museums/institutions/corporations across the country, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and, most recently, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. This morning when he mentioned that someone had just donated one of his works to the MFA and that there had been some concern over rights or something, he said, “Do what you want with it. Exploit me. What are they gonna do, turn it into a pillow?” Which maybe isn’t as hilarious as I think it is if you don’t know Andy. But hey, some of his most recent work would be GREAT on a pillow, amirite?

Check out Andy’s website.

- Meg ‘12

This term, I have a class in the Deane Carriage Barn, which is a con because it’s so far away from my room, but a pro because a) the class is great and b) I get to look over at this painting whenever I want. Bennington has a lot of cool art in cool places, but this is one of my favorites. Flame On (1964) is by Jules Olitski, an abstract expressionist who taught at Bennington for a little while but is mostly known for being one of the most important painters of his generation. We’re very lucky to have this piece in our collection, and especially lucky that we can go chill with it any old time we want.

- Meg ‘12

So, I’ve been hearing a lot about ceramics throughout my time here, and I decided I would go and investigate.  These are pictures of my first exposure to the vibrant culture around ceramics which I had no idea about.  The studio is lively, people are friendly, and you get to make a mess with clay!  I’m kind of crushing on the ceramics culture, so much so I think I’m gonna try to fight my way into Beginner’s Pottery Wheel next term.

-Dmitri ‘12

Studios in visual art at Bennington

This is my studio space in Swan Garage on campus this term! It’s called Swan Garage because it is a garage-like space behind Swan House (one of the colonials).

One of the best things about studying art at Bennington is that in your junior or senior year, after you’ve demonstrated a lot of work in one particular art, you get a studio space on campus. They are located in lots of small buildings spread around the campus in more secluded parts of it, and because of this the studios become these really wonderful secrets to visual arts students. We are encouraged to decorate our spaces, be in them a lot, visit each other…lots of classes will even spend a day going from studio to studio to see how one another work.

Here I am in front of Swan Garage, which I share with other visual arts students. I concentrate in photography and mixed media work but the other artists in the garage work in many different mediums, from print making to painting.

For me, having a space all to myself to just think and work in is awesome. I can be in it whenever I want and use it in any way I want. This is a way in which I feel I really benefit from the size of the campus. At a bigger school, I probably never would have been able to have a studio as an undergraduate. Instead, I can paint and put together my work in a space that is entirely dictated by me.

-India K, ‘12

Luis Meléndez, Still Life with Chocolate Service, 1770
My Spanish painting class with the amazing Dan Hofstadter continues to amuse and interest me. Today we looked at Meléndez and his amazing still lifes, really advanced and detailed for the time. Many consider him the master of the Spanish still life genre.
This is what Dan has to say about the awesome one shown above:
"This is like your most adorable breakfast. Don’t you just want to be there?"
-India K, ‘12

Luis Meléndez, Still Life with Chocolate Service, 1770

My Spanish painting class with the amazing Dan Hofstadter continues to amuse and interest me. Today we looked at Meléndez and his amazing still lifes, really advanced and detailed for the time. Many consider him the master of the Spanish still life genre.

This is what Dan has to say about the awesome one shown above:

"This is like your most adorable breakfast. Don’t you just want to be there?"

-India K, ‘12

One of my favorite things to do is research my professors. All of the Bennington faculty are “teacher practitioners,” meaning they’re all doing their own work (research, composing, painting, writing) while they’re teaching at Bennington. The great thing about this is, you learn from their personal, current experience in the field that you may be interested it. It gives a great perspective.

My art history professor is a painter named Andrew Spence (Andy also teaches painting classes). The class is entitled “Art in America Since WWII,” so it covers a lot of art that’s abstract and non-figurative. As a teacher practitioner, Andy is both painting currently, lives in New York, and has lived as an artist during many of the eras/movements we talk about in class. So cool! Here is some of Andy’s art as found on his website: http://www.andrewspenceart.com

-Leah

This week’s Dan Hofstadter quote, brought to you by the class “Spanish and Catalan Heritage: Painting and Sculpture”!
Of “Las Meninas” by Diego Velázquez, painted in 1656, Dan says:
“‘Las Meninas’ should be a mystery! Let it be a mystery, like the person you’re in love with! You’ll never get it but that’s why it’s beautiful.”
-India K, ‘12

This week’s Dan Hofstadter quote, brought to you by the class “Spanish and Catalan Heritage: Painting and Sculpture”!

Of “Las Meninas” by Diego Velázquez, painted in 1656, Dan says:

“‘Las Meninas’ should be a mystery! Let it be a mystery, like the person you’re in love with! You’ll never get it but that’s why it’s beautiful.”

-India K, ‘12

We were looking at this painting in my Art History class last Friday morning. It is Bacchus by Caravaggio, and it now hangs in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. My professor, the amazing and very intelligent Dan Hofstadter, likes to go on little tangents now and then. In seeing this painting he says “You know this is one of those paintings that gives people Stendhal Syndrome. They go to the Uffizi and become overwhelmed by all the beauty and they fall over and faint and wind up in the neurological or psychiatric ward from all the splendor they’ve seen.”
We all cracked up but out of curiosity I googled “Stendhal Syndrome.”
Read it and weep, guys. It’s real.
-India K, ‘12

We were looking at this painting in my Art History class last Friday morning. It is Bacchus by Caravaggio, and it now hangs in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. My professor, the amazing and very intelligent Dan Hofstadter, likes to go on little tangents now and then. In seeing this painting he says “You know this is one of those paintings that gives people Stendhal Syndrome. They go to the Uffizi and become overwhelmed by all the beauty and they fall over and faint and wind up in the neurological or psychiatric ward from all the splendor they’ve seen.”

We all cracked up but out of curiosity I googled “Stendhal Syndrome.”

Read it and weep, guys. It’s real.

-India K, ‘12